Let’s surrender

Are you finding yourself experiencing that same old issue again? Doing that familiar one step forward, two steps back dance? Fighting the help that is there? You want and deserve more but can’t seem to get out of your way.

Let’s admit it. Change is not easy. Nor is it a smooth process. Even in the best of circumstances, knowing what we want and having nothing in our way, we can become stuck. In these moments, there is a tug of war within our self – fighting change. Often, we are not conscious of this fight.

Resistance can show up in so many different ways. Negative beliefs, for example, that we carry about ourselves, others and the world often discourage taking any action toward positive change to begin with. Secondly, when we make a decision to change, there is emotional resistance, where we experience a sense of fear and ambivalence as we step into the unknown of change and concerned we will lose our identity. Finally, with successful change, limiting beliefs that tell us that we are not competent, hold no self-worth, have limited choice and do not deserve freedom often lead to self-sabotaging actions.

Our internal resistance can leave us feeling tired, miserable, unworthy and hopeless. It is easy to see ourselves as a victim during this time. The unfortunate outcome is giving up.

Imagine for a moment a life in which you are free of resistance to change. Where you are conscious of the aspects of yourself that can get in your way, and no longer give them the power over you. Imagine a life where you are fully free to grow in ways of your choosing. Where you allow and enjoy the process of change. What would that be like?

This is the time to seek support from a caring and understanding individual. From someone who has experienced their own internal fight against change and now chooses surrender. Someone who can help you determine how you are preventing change and teach you how to get out of the way.

We have a lot in common you and I. For years I operated with two main beliefs from childhood that got in my way. I believed I was a slow learner and as a result decided “no matter how hard I try I don’t get it”. This shame, believing I was not good enough, has been a major obstacle in my life. My family’s success rose and sank with my father’s depression. This left me with the belief that “good things don’t last”. Hope, as a result, became a dangerous thing to feel.

I never want another person to suffer through needless pain of ambivalence, self-pity and unworthiness of their own doing again. Your search for how to get out of your way begins today by scheduling a free phone consultation with me.